Top Five Underused Compliments

As someone who enjoys accolades and commendations, I thought it would be best to rank the Top 5 Underused Compliments.

This list is like peanuts in a bar, it’s complementary (I know it’s spelled differently but I can’t read this out loud to all of you, just to my family members who are constantly subjected to these terrible jokes.)

First, a few honorable mentions:

The Bee’s Knees and The Cat’s Pajamas– Both compliments are fun to say, but they don’t have any real meaning that I can find, so they will remain out of the Top 5 for now. Also, I don’t like bees or pajamas.

Fancy Pants – This is not generally considered to be a compliment, but I am rarely fancy and would consider it an honor if someone said, “Hey, check out Mr. Fancy Pants over there.” Fancy, me, oh, dare to dream.

Rad – Can you imagine if someone actually referred to you as rad? “That Doug is the raddest dude I know.” I heard rad often in the 1970s and 1980s from gnarly dudes who attended rad parties, but I was far too busy just trying to fit in and conform to ever be rad.

5.  A hepcat – A hip person who knows the latest trends in fashion, music and other topics is a hepcat. Just the name sounds smooth. I will never be cool enough to be a hepcat, but I definitely want to refer to someone else as a hepcat soon in the hopes that just saying it will make me cooler. “Man, that hepcat Adam sure can swing.”

4. A dandy – “Oh, he’s a dandy!’ is a great way to be described. The dictionary definition is for a man who cares a great deal about his appearance and his clothes, but people also use this phrase to describe someone who is unique. If I could get someone to call me a “Dandy” or even “A real pip,” it would be sweet. Note: Pip can also be a negative term, but I would be happy being referred to as a pip whether it is meant as good or bad.

3. Tall Drink of Water – This one is just descriptive and generally means that the person is tall, thin and sometimes attractive. It is also, though, a phrase that is extraordinarily awesome. I definitely want to describe someone as a Tall Drink of Water sometime soon. Whomever I describe in that manner will probably become a good friend.

2. That kid’s got spunk – “You’ve got to give it to that Claussen kid, he’s got spunk!” It’s right out of a movie. Along the same lines, I would be honored to have someone mentioning my “gumption,” “savvy,” or “moxie.” “There’s just something about that kid out there, he’s got moxie!” I love these compliments more than I can describe.

1. I like the cut of his jib – Can you imagine if someone said this about you? “How about that Scott? I really like the cut of his jib.” It is awesome and is definitely the Top Underused Compliment. This phrase actually has a meaning related to sailing and makes sense. It’s basically the cat’s knees and bee’s pajamas of compliments, that even normal drinks of water can use if they have spunk, along with the savvy to know the correct time to point out when you like the cut of some rad fancy pants’ jib.

Any underused compliments that you want to share or use to describe this blog? Thanks for reading.

6 thoughts on “Top Five Underused Compliments

  1. […] I need some other talent traded in to help me, too. The other columnists can’t be too good, as I want to the best writer and I want to be the star, but they also can’t be too bad, as I need help for when I can’t think of ideas or I have an injured fingernail and can’t type. It needs to be the perfect blend of being great, but not as great as me. That shouldn’t be too tough. I also need someone who can compliment my writing skills on a blog. And yes, I meant compliment. […]

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