I. Don’t. Like. This. Trend.

It’s interesting to see how certain trends become popular in our culture today. At the same time, though, it’s also frustrating if I am not a big fan of some of the trends.

For example, I am constantly seeing people using periods in order to create emphasis in a sentence. I understand why they do it and I suppose it is working for them, but it’s still annoying.

Someone may write “This. Needs. To. Stop.” or something like that to try to cleverly emphasize what they are saying, but what I see is “Sen. Tence. Frag. Ment.” Continue reading “I. Don’t. Like. This. Trend.”

What’s the deal with rhetorical questions? Read on for the answer (and additional pointless thoughts)

Life is filled with many great questions, such as “Why are we here?”, “Where is the restroom?” and “Can I really put three question marks in one sentence?”

I may not have the answers to all of those questions, but I do have some important information to share with you today.

Continue reading “What’s the deal with rhetorical questions? Read on for the answer (and additional pointless thoughts)”

Ore or oar? A family of words with the same sounds but different spellings

One interesting and occasionally frustrating part of the English language involves words that sound exactly the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

These words are homophones and according to the people over there, they’re their favorite types of words.

Personally I’d like to carve these words into stone, but would wood be better? I recently noticed that one family of words seems to have won the homophones championship, and I asked myself, “Is this something people want to know? No or yes?” Continue reading “Ore or oar? A family of words with the same sounds but different spellings”

This post about no-words like no-brainer and no-doubter is a no-thinker

I often hear people say that a decision is a no-brainer, meaning it is relatively simple choice.

That’s fine, but by the same logic I think we should say that a decision that requires some thought is a “brainer.”

“I am not sure what type of bread to buy; this sure is a brainer,” one might say, since bread purchasing is a difficult task. Continue reading “This post about no-words like no-brainer and no-doubter is a no-thinker”